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Search returned 110 results using Keyword: "Evidence of student learning"



1. Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO).
The Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes will test what students in higher education know and can do upon graduation. More than a ranking, AHELO is a direct evaluation of student performance. It will provide data on the relevance and quality of teaching and learning in higher education. The test aims to be global and valid across diverse cultures, languages and different types of institutions.
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2. Association for the Assessment of Learning in Higher Education (AALHE).
AALHE is an organization of practitioners interested in using effective assessment practice to document and improve student learning. There are also blog entries to stimulate online conversations about assessment. Membership in the AALHE is open to all who have an interest in assessing and improving student learning in higher education. Individual and institutional memberships are available.
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3. Building Engagement and Attainment for Minority Students (BEAMS).
Specifically focused on student engagement and student learning, the BEAMS program worked with MSIs to improve student engagement and success. Over 100 baccalaureate MSIs were involved in the program.
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4. MSIs models of success program.
Lumina Foundation for Education's MSIs Models of Success Program is a recent effort to promote student success at MSIs. Funded by Lumina Foundation for Education, IHEP controlled the technical aspects of the program for grantees. Its five goals included: 1. Improve MSIs' capacity to collect, analyze and use data to inform decisions that promote student success. 2. Strengthen policy and practice to improve developmental education. 3. Create a collective voice for policy advocacy on behalf of MSIs. 4. Increase MSIs' commitment to transparency and effectiveness in improving student outcomes. 5. Increase completion or graduation rates among underserved students, especially men of color.
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5. 2003. National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL).
The 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy is a nationally representative assessment of English literacy among American adults age 16 and older. Sponsored by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), NAAL is the nation's most comprehensive measure of adult literacy since the 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS).
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6. Presidents' Alliance for Excellence in Student Learning and Accountability.
Institutions joining the Presidents' Alliance, an initiative of the new Leadership Alliance for Student Learning and Accountability, are publicly making a commitment to significantly improve assessment of, and accountability for, student learning outcomes on their campuses. This involves committing to an Action Plan to build on previous work to assess, report on, and use evidence to improve student learning.
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7. Ambrose, S. A., & Poklop, L. 2015, January/February. Do Students Really Learn from Experience?.
“For more than a century, experiential learning—most notably cooperative education—has been embedded in the curriculum at Northeastern University. The original program placed eight students in four companies, in an “earn-learn-earn-learn” model that enabled students to pay for their tuition with the income from their co-op jobs.”
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8. Ambrose, S.A., Bridges, M.W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M.C., & Norman, M.K. 2010. How learning works: 7 research-based principles for smart teaching.
In this practical guide, Ambrose and colleagues present an extensive series of examples of some common problems and misunderstandings that frequently occur in classrooms at all levels of instruction. Each section then explains what well-known and researched learning principle is responsible for that type of event, or how it can be used to fix that problem. Very accessible and easily understandable, the authors here provide a list of tools and fix-it strategies, well-grounded in research and psychological theory, useful for educators.
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9. Anderson, P., Gonyea, R.M., Anson, C.M., & Paine, C. 2015. The Contributions of Writing to Learning and Development: Results from a Large-Scale Multi-institutional Study.
This article explores how and to what degree writing in college is associated with learning and development. The study examined survey responses from over 70,000 first-year and senior students enrolled at 80 colleges/universities in the U.S., and was a partnership between NSSE and CWPA.
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10. Arcario, P., Eynon, B., Klages, M., & Polnariev, B. A. 2013. Closing the loop: How we better serve our students through a comprehensive assessment process.
Outcomes assessment is often driven by demands for accountability. LaGuardia Community College's outcomes assessment model has advanced student learning, shaped academic program development, and created an impressive culture of faculty-driven assessment. Our inquiry-based approach uses ePortfolios for collection of student work and demonstrates the importance of engaging faculty input into the outcomes assessment design to continually "close the assessment loop." This article outlines the steps, successes, and challenges involved in constructing an effective outcomes assessment model that deepens learning across the institution.
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11. Association of American Colleges and Universities. 2011, Fall/2012, Winter. Assessing liberal education outcomes using VALUE rubrics.
The use of AAC&U's VALUE Rubrics to assess student learning at colleges and universities around the nation is the central focus of this issue.
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12. Association of American Colleges and Universities. 2002. Greater expectations: A new vision for learning as the nation goes to college.
This article provides an overview of the Greater Expectations Initiative, conducted by AAC&U from 2000-2006 which "articulated the aims and purposes of a twenty-first century liberal education and identified innovative models that improve campus practices and learning for all undergraduate students, and advocated for a comprehensive approach to reform." The results of this project helped to formulate AAC&U's current LEAP initiative.
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13. Association of American Colleges and Universities. 2007. Rising to the challenge: Meaningful assessment of student learning .
This article provides an overview of VALUE, or Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education, "a national project to advance our understanding around assessment student learning outcomes."
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14. Baker, G. R., Jankowski, N., Provezis, S. & Kinzie, J. 2012, July. Using assessment results: Promising practices of institutions that do it well.
To learn more about what colleges and universities are doing to use assessment data productively to inform and strengthen undergraduate education, NILOA conducted nine case studies. This report synthesizes the insights from these individual studies to discern promising practices in using information about student learning. The report concludes with lessons learned and reflective questions to help institutions advance their own assessment efforts within their specific institutional contexts.
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15. Barrett, J.M. 2012. Writing assessment in the humanities: Culture and methodology.
This article examines methodological and institutional challenges for empirically measuring student performance on writing. Writing’s intrinsic subjectivity and the great variety of writing formats appropriate to diverse contexts raise fundamental questions about the empirical bias of the assessment culture taking root in U.S. higher education. At the same time, the academic training of humanist scholars, who typically have primary responsibility for writing pedagogy in universities, may predispose them to skepticism about assessment culture’s broader mission. This article narrates the process by which the Humanities Department at Lawrence Technological University implemented a writing assessment process designed to address these challenges and evaluates the data generated by this process.
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16. Blaich, C. F. & Wise, K. S. January 2011. From gathering to using assessment results: Lessons from the Wabash national study.
Drawing from the Wabash Study, a multi-institutional longitudinal research and assessment project, Charlie Blaich and Kathy Wise, from the Center of Inquiry at Wabash College, share their field-tested findings and lessons learned about campus use of assessment results. The Wabash Study assists institutions in collecting, understanding and using data. The researchers at the Center of Inquiry found the last component to be the real challenge—using the data for improved student learning. In this Occasional Paper, Blaich and Wise describe the accountability movement, the history and purpose of the Wabash Study, and the reasons why institutions have a hard time moving from gathering data to using data, giving five practical steps to campus leaders for using the data collected.
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17. Blaney, J.,Filer, K., & Lyon, J. Summer 2014. Assessing High Impact Practices Using NVivo: An Automated Approach to Analyzing Student Reflections for Program Improvement.
Roanoke College developed a system to automate the qualitative coding process using NVivo, a software analysis tool, allowing them to identify patterns in student learning that indicate effective and ineffective aspects of applied learning experiences. The NVivo query approach led to increased efficiency in the assessment of most HIPs included in the experiential learning program at Roanoke College.
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18. Bollag, B. 2006. Using quality benchmarks for assessing and developing undergraduate programs.
This book uses selected performance criteria benchmarks to assist undergraduate programs to define their educational missions and goals as well as to document their effectiveness. It helps faculty and administrators use benchmarks not only to assess outcomes of student learning, but to program assessment, evaluate student learning, create meaningful faculty scholarship, ensure quality teaching, and forge connection to the community.
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19. Bowen, K. . 2014. Badges: A common currency for learning.
The article discusses the use of digital badges, or open badges, in higher education as common currency and documentation of educational outcomes. Topics include the development of the Mozilla Foundation's Mozilla Open Badges infrastructure in 2011, the mobile device application Passport, developed in 2012 by Purdue University, and the benefits of digital badges for career prospects. Commentary from Mozilla senior director of learning Erin Knight is provided.
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20. Bransford, J.D. and Donovan, S.M. 2005. How students learn: history, mathematics, and science in the classroom.
From the Publisher: “The book explores how the principles of learning can be applied in teaching history, science, and math topics at three levels: elementary, middle, and high school. Leading educators explain in detail how they developed successful curricula and teaching approaches, presenting strategies that serve as models for curriculum development and classroom instruction…”
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21. Bresciani, M. Summer 2011. Identifying barriers in implementing outcomes-based assessments program review: A grounded theory analysis.
While conversations proposing standardized testing within higher education abound (Allen & Bresciani, 2003; Department of Education (DOE), 2006; Ewell, 1997a, 1997b; Ewell & Jones, 1996; Maki, 2004; Palomba & Banta, 1999), proponents of outcomes-based assessment program review are still applauding the value and extent that the process can be used to inform decisions to improve student learning and development (Bresciani, 2006; Bresciani, Zelna, & Anderson, 2004; Huba & Freed, 2000; Maki, 2004; Mentkowski, 2000; Palomba & Banta, 1999; Suskie, 2004). As such, practitioners of outcomes-based assessment continue to seek various ways to meaningfully engage in outcomes-based assessment program review in order to find ways to improve student learning and development.
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22. Bresciani, M. 2006. Outcomes-based academic and co-curricular program review: A compilation of institutional good practices.
This book, intended for faculty, administrators, and staff, explains how sustaintable outcomes-based assessment programs are created and maintained.
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23. Bridges, B. K., Kinzie, J., Nelson Laird, T. F., & Kuh, G. D. 2008. Student engagement and student success at historically Black and Hispanic-serving institutions.
This book chapter provides examples of the use of student engagement assessments and data to promote student success at MSIs.
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24. Buyarski, C.A., & Landis, C.M. 2014. Using an ePortfolio to assess the outcomes of a first-year seminar: student narrative and authentic assessment.
The authors analyzed at 47 ePortfolios of first-year seminar students. Using the combination of a rubric and identification of authentic evidence, results suggested that the ePortfolio can thoroughly assess student learning when combined with a rubric and examining authentic evidence.
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25. California State University Northridge. 2014. SUNY's General Education "tips" for closing the loop and frequently asked questions.
SUNY’s General Education Assessment “Tips” for Closing the Loop and Frequently Asked Questions
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26. Carr-Lopez, S. Galal, S, Vyas, D, Patel, R., & E. Gnesa. 2014. The utility of concept maps to facilitate higher-level learning in a large classroom setting.
The authors address the issue of engaging students to learn information rather than memorize in pharmacy curricula based classes. The authors wanted to understand how students can engage in active learning through the use of concept maps. Accordingly, they wrote about a study that compared test scores between an experimental and control group. They determined that concept maps helped students’ experience meaningful learning.
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27. CHEA International Quality Group. 2013, May.. A Government Official's Guide: Quality Assurance of Higher Education in an International Setting.
This is the first issue of CHEA International Quality Group's Policy Brief series. This issue provides a succinct discussion of quality assurance of higher education in an international setting.
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28. Coker, J. S., & Porter, D. J. 2015, January/February. Maximizing Experiential Learning for Student Success.
“The positive impacts of experiential learning are well documented: gains in deep learning, practical competence, persistence rates, civic engagement, appreciation of diversity, professional networks, and many others (Kuh and O'Donnell, 2013; Hesser, 2013). For example, a recent national study by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) showed that experiential learning has powerful benefits for students across every area measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement (Finley and McNair, 2013). This being the case, efforts by individual campuses to improve experiential-learning programs can have significant educational rewards.”
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29. Collegiate Learning Assessment. 2016. CLA+ national results, 2015-16.
This report summarizes the performance of the 100 institutions and 20,681 students who participated in the 2015-2016 academic year of CLA+.
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30. Collins, R. K. 2010. Fueling the race to postsecondary success: A 48-institution study of prior learning assessment and adult student outcomes.
Prior Learning Assessment, or PLA, is another important and often overlooked strategy for helping adults progress towards a degree. PLA is the process by which many colleges evaluate for academic credit the college-level knowledge and skills an individual has gained outside of the classroom (or from non-college instructional programs), including employment, military training/service, travel, hobbies, civic activities and volunteer service. PLA recognizes and legitimizes the often significant learning in which adults have engaged in many parts of their lives.
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31. Connor, R. June 2011. Navigating a perfect storm.
There’s good reason to think that higher education is about to confront a perfect storm, a convergence of troubles that are more than the usual bluster. The economy is not just slow to recover; it may be ‘hollowing out’ in ways that undermine the old claim that going to college guarantees a good job upon graduation. Confidence in higher education may also be waning, if not among the general public then among policy makers troubled by stagnant graduation rates and slippage in the rank order of percentage of adults with baccalaureate degrees compared to some other highly developed countries.
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32. Cunningham, A., & Leegwater, L. 2011. Minority-serving institutions: What can we learn? .
The role that MSIs play in the lives of low-income, students of color, in respect to institutional policies and practices particular to these institutions, are the focus of this chapter. Included are promising practices facilitating student success and ways to circumvent potential barriers for low-income students at MSIs.
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33. Dalal, D. K., Hakel, M. D., Sliter, M. T., & Kirkendall, S. R. 2012. Analysis of a rubric for assessing depth of classroom reflections.

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34. Davis Sr., L. 2009. Still striving: The role of faculty and staff in the SACS accreditation process.
Involvement of faculty and staff in the accreditation process has never been more important. Without their involvement, student learning outcomes and therefore, quality education cannot properly be addressed. This goal of this paper is “to encourage HBCU faculty and staff to embrace their roles in relation to accreditation and better understand SACS’ requirements and points of emphasis” (p. 3).
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35. Debra Humphreys, Heather McCambly, and Judith Ramaley. October 07, 2015. The Quality of a College Degree: Toward New Frameworks, Evidence, and Interventions.
This report builds on information and recommendations from AAC&U's DQP Quality Collaboratives project. Authors offer recommendations for more efficient and effective transfer from two-year to four-year institutions in terms of student achievement of learning outcomes expressed in the Degree Qualifications Profile. The report also shares a framework for bridging educators with state and policy makers to ensure educational quality.
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36. Delta Cost Project on Postsecondary Education Costs, Productivity, and Accountability. 2009, December. Calculating cost-return for investments in student success.
This report provides resources for those interested in trying to calculate the cost-effectiveness of retention programs for first-year students. Cost-return worksheets for institutional use are also included.
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37. Driscoll, M.P. 2005. Psychology of Learning for Instruction (3rd Ed.).
Intended for use across the range of instructional settings, this book offers ideas on the usage of various learning theories. The author seeks to clarify complex terms and theories within the field.
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38. Dwyer, C. A., Millett, C. M. & Payne, D. G. 2006, June. A culture of evidence: Postsecondary assessment and learning outcomes.
To understand the value that a college experience adds to student inputs, three measurements must be addressed: Student input measures (What were student competencies before college?, student output measures (What were student competencies after college?), and a measure of change between inputs and outputs. This paper also briefly reviews principles of fair and valid testing that pertain to the assessments being recommended.
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39. Elgie, S., Childs, R., Fenton, N.E., Levy, B.A., Lopes, V., Szala-Meneok, K., Wiggers, R.D. 2012. Researching teaching and student outcomes in postsecondary education.
“The guide reflects a growing dedication to assessment and evaluation in teaching and learning, and more broadly to evidence-based practice in all issues related to student success,”
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40. Elrod, S. . 2014, Summer. Quantitative Reasoning: The Next "Across the Curriculum" Movement.
This article explains what Quantitative Reasoning (QR) is, why faculty and administrators need to expand the opportunities students have to understand and engage in QR, offers learning outcomes to establish in associate through master’s level courses, and ways to assess programs that stress QR.
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41. Erwin, T. D. Summer 2012. Intellectual college development related to alumni perceptions of personal growth.
Alumni self-ratings of their personal growth were linked to their intellectual development during college four to seven years earlier. Graduates that were satisfied with their personal growth in the arts, creative thinking, making logical inferences, learning independently, exercising initiative, and tolerating other points of view had higher intellectual scores in Commitment and Empathy as undergraduates years earlier. These findings support a relationship between college student intellectual development and alumni perceptions of their personal growth. The implications of this study support continuing the custom of querying graduates about their earlier education, a practice in wide use already; and add to the validity of the Scale of Intellectual Development as a measure of college impact upon personal dispositions.
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42. Ewell, P., Paulson, K., & Kinzie, J. June 2011. Down and in: Assessment practices at the program level.
To follow up the 2009 National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) report on institutional assessment activity described by chief academic officers, NILOA surveyed program heads in the two and four-year sectors to gain a more complete picture of assessment activity at the program or department level.
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43. Fulcher, K. H., Good, M. R., Coleman, C. M., & Smith, K. L. 2014, December. A Simple Model for Learning Improvement: Weigh Pig, Feed Pig, Weigh Pig.
Assessing learning does not by itself result in increased student accomplishment, much like a pig never fattened up because it was weighed. Indeed, recent research shows that while institutions are more regularly engaging in assessment, they have little to show in the way of stronger student performance. This paper clarifies how assessment results are related to improved learning – assess, effectively intervene, re-assess – and contrasts this process with mere changes in assessment methodology and changes to pedagogy and curriculum. It also explores why demonstrating improvement has proven difficult for higher education. The authors propose a solution whereby faculty, upper administration, pedagogy/curriculum experts, and assessment specialists collaborate to enhance student learning.
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44. Gasman, M., Baez, B., & Turner, C. S. V. (Eds.). 2009. Understanding minority-serving institutions.
In this book, the authors address pertinent issues and ideas related to MSIs. A few of the chapter titles include: "Minority Serving Institutions: A Historical Backdrop; Student Engagement and Student Success at Historically Black and Hispanic-Serving institutions; and The Adversity of Diversity: Regional Associations and the Accreditation of Minority Serving Institutions." In addition, Minority Serving Institutions are defined and details about their particular characteristics are discussed.
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45. Gibson, D., Ostashewski, N., Flintoff, K., Grant, S., & Knight, E. . 2015. Digital badges in education.
Digital badges provide new affordances for online educational activities and experiences. When used with points and leaderboards, a badge can become a gamification element allowing learners to compete with themselves or others, and to know how close they are to accomplishing a goal and acquiring its accompanying reputation. In this role, badges motivate continued engagement, which increases time on task and supports skill acquisition through performance. Learning outcomes signified by badges can also be displayed in an e-portfolio or on web sites and are highly transportable to social media sites. In this role they summarize achievement and signal accomplishment. With these characteristics, digital badges have the potential to become an alternative credentialing system, providing visible recognition in digital symbols that link directly via metadata to validating evidence of educational achievements in public displays. This paper traces the brief history of digital badges, defines what they are, gives examples of their use, and discusses their educational affordances.
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46. Gilchrist, D., & Oakleaf, M. April 2012. An essential partner: The librarian’s role in student learning assessment.
Debra Gilchrist and Megan Oakleaf, two leaders in librarianship and assessment, document the ways librarians contribute toward campus efforts of student learning assessment. The paper includes a variety of examples of institutions that have developed student learning assessment processes.
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47. Green, M. F. 2012. Measuring and assessing internationalization.
A publication from NAFSA: Association of International Educators examines the performance of institutions and student learning outcomes through two different frameworks. The challenge is for institutions to create a manageable and meaningful approach to understanding the true impact and ultimately the success of internationalization efforts.
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48. Hamline University. 2014. Learning outcomes assessment. Reporting.
Reporting is the most important step in the continuous cycle of learning assessment. It is the collaborative process through which programs use evidence of student learning to gauge the efficacy of collective educational practices, and to identify and implement strategies for improving student learning. Responses can range from curricular or pedagogical change to new faculty/staff development or student learning activities, and from comprehensive revision to evidence-based affirmation of current practice.
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49. Hardison, C. M., & Vilamovska, A. 2009. The collegiate learning assessment: Setting standards for performance at a college or university.
"This report illustrates how institutions can set their own standards on the CLA using a method that is appropriate for the CLA's unique characteristics. The authors examined evidence of reliability and procedural validity of a standard-setting methodology that they developed and applied to the CLA."
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50. Huba, M.E. & Freed, J. E. 1999. Learner-centered assessment on college campuses: Shifting the focus from teaching to learning.
A guide to moving toward student-based assessment and outcomes grounded in constructivist learning theory and continuous improvement.
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51. Hubert, D.A., & Lewis, K.J. 2014. A framework for general education assessment: Assessing information literacy and quantitative literacy with ePortfolios.
Examining 100 random student ePortfolios from General Education courses using two college-wide learning outcomes, the authors reflect on how use of ePortfolios can effectively assess student work. Benefits of using ePortfolios, particularly in General Education, are also discussed.
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52. Hurtado, S., & DeAngelo, L. 2012, Spring. Linking diversity and civic-minded practices with student outcomes: New evidence from national surveys.
This article examines national data to understand more about the impact of diversity and civic-related practices in regards to specific student outcomes.
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53. In W. Houghton (Ed.), Engineering Subject Centre Guide: Learning and Teaching Theory for Engineering Academics. 2004, March. Deep and surface approaches to learning.
In this document we look at the associated concept of approaches to learning. The original work on approaches to learning was carried out by Marton and Saljo (1976). Their study explored students’ approaches to learning a particular task. Students were given an academic text to read, and were told that they would subsequently be asked questions on that text. The students adopted two differing approaches to learning. The first group adopted an approach where they tried to understand the whole picture and tried to comprehend and understand the academic work. These students were identified with adopting a deep approach to learning. The second group tried to remember facts contained within the text, identifying and focusing on what they thought they would be asked later. They demonstrated an approach that we would recognize as rote learning, or a superficial, surface approach.
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54. Jankowski, N. July 2011. Juniata College: Faculty led assessment.
Juniata College was identified as an example of good assessment practice for the faculty-led Center for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL Center) that champions and supports evidence-based teaching; an administration-supported accountability website that provides data and information about outcomes to multiple audiences; and the use of evidence of student learning to make improvements at the institution and individual course levels.
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55. Jankowski, N. April 2012. St. Olaf College: Utilization-Focused Assessment.
The National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) selected St. Olaf as a case study institution due to the institutional framing of assessment as inquiry in support of student learning and as meaningful, manageable, and mission-driven; the utilization-focus/backward-design approach employed in assessment; the integration of student learning outcomes assessment processes into faculty governance structures; and the collaborative involvement of multiple stakeholders and diverse ways in which evidence of student learning is utilized throughout the institution.
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56. Jankowski, N. A., Ikenberry, S. O., Kinzie, J., Kuh, G. D., Shenoy, G. F., & Baker, G. R. March 2012. Transparency & accountability: An evaluation of the VSA college portrait pilot.
The Voluntary System of Accountability (VSA) is a vehicle for public four-year universities to report comparable information about the undergraduate student experience via the College Portrait, a common web reporting template. NILOA evaluated the effectiveness of the student learning outcomes pilot project within the College Portrait resulting in this report: Transparency & Accountability: An Evaluation of the VSA College Portrait Pilot. The evaluation took place October 2011 through February 2012, drawing on a variety of data sources.
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57. Jankowski, N., & Kinzie, J. October 2016. Future directions of assessment: Movement on the field..
This presentation explores three shifts in the field of assessment toward more cross-cutting, integrative initiatives and projects. Efforts to document student learning through co-curricular transcripts and active integration of academic affairs and student affairs will be discussed, followed by an overview of the importance of transparent communication to various audiences of our current initiatives and ongoing assessment activities. The presentation will conclude with an overview of what NILOA has been learning from institutions through the work of tracking and mapping involvement with the Degree Qualifications Profile.
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58. Jankowski, N., & Makela, J. P. June 2010. Exploring the landscape: What institutional websites reveal about student learning outcomes assessment activities.
Despite persistent calls for colleges and universities to post student learning outcomes assessment information to their websites, the assessment information that can be found online falls considerably short of the activities reported by chief academic officers. The study finds that institutions are often not taking full advantage of their website to increase transparency regarding student learning outcomes assessment. The researchers share their findings and offer recommendations for institutions.
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59. Jankowski, N., & Provezis, S. November 2011. Making student learning evidence transparent: The state of the art.
Making Student Learning Evidence Transparent: The State of the Art is composed of four sections. The sections cover 1) the impact of national transparency initiatives; 2) the changing landscape of transparency; 3) the display of assessment results and their subsequent use; and 4) a synthesis of the previous three sections.
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60. Janosik, S.M., & Frank, T.E. 2013. Using ePortfolios to Measure Student Learning in a Graduate Preparation Program in Higher Education.

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61. Kehoe, A., & Goudzwaard, M. . 2015. ePortfolios, badges, and the whole digital self: How evidence-based learning pedagogies and technologies can support integrative learning and identity development.

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62. Keith, B., Greenwood, N. A., Hampe, G., et al. 2007. Sociology and General Education.
The task force aimed to develop models and rationales for the various ways in which sociology courses contribute to general education requirements and liberal arts skills. In doing so they recommend that “sociology departments should collect and systematically analyze assessment data and communicate these results to faculty, students, and appropriate publics to ensure that student performance is consistent with the general education learning goals.” The authors examine various general education learning outcomes (e.g. quantitative literacy and critical thinking), and analyze their contribution to sociology majors.
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63. Keller, C. M. 2014, September/October. Lessons from the Voluntary System of Accountability (VSA): The Intersection of Collective Action & Public Policy.
This resource offers four lessons for federal policymakers and higher education administrators and faculty from the Voluntary System of Accountability (VSA): (1) Build a foundation of trustworthy data; (2) Report meaningful, targeted information; (3) Educate users on key metrics; and (4) Work toward collective, integrated action.
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64. Kinzie, J. October 2010. Perspectives from campus leaders on the current state of student learning outcomes assessment: NILOA focus group summary 2009-2010.
This paper highlights lessons from four focus group sessions with campus leaders--presidents, provosts, academic deans and directors of institutional research from a variety of two- and four-year institutions-- regarding their perspectives on the state of learning assessment practices on their campuses.
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65. Kuh, G. D. 1999. How are we doing? Tracking the quality of the undergraduate experience, 1960s to the present.
This paper examines the quality of the undergraduate experience, drawing upon several decades of CSEQ data.
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66. Kuh, G., & Ikenberry, S. October 2009. More than you think, less than we need: Learning outcomes assessment in American higher education.
The 2009 report from the National Institute of Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) is based on information from more than 1,500 regionally accredited degree-granting institutions in the U.S. The NILOA study, titled “More Than You Think, Less Than We Need: Learning Outcomes Assessment in American Higher Education,” summarizes what colleges and universities are doing to measure student learning.
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67. Lagotte, B. Summer 2012. Review of “good education in an age of measurement”.
In Good Education in an Age of Measurement, Gert J.J. Biesta argues that analysis about what constitutes a “good” education demands more than the evidence-based, “best practice” paradigm currently offers. Furthermore, the narrow perspective of assessing learning outcomes may prove detrimental for education towards a deeply democratic society. Although not exactly the type of insight assessment researchers might welcome, Biesta’s thoughtful critique can ultimately enhance the ways scholars evaluate the quality of education. Biesta reinvigorates discussions about what constitutes a good education, specifically the purpose of education. Concerned about a lack of attention to purposes in the research literature, Biesta puts this issue front and center. His inquiry includes a normative perspective rather than only a managerial focus on education as a technique. That is, he produces a conceptual framework for why we ought to focus on particular educational goals. To this end, Biesta provides a three-prong framework.
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68. League for Innovation and Questionmark. 2004. An assessment framework for the community college: Measuring student learning and achievement as a means of demonstrating institutional effectiveness.
This white paper was composed by an advisory team of community college practitioners and assessment experts and provides a framework for assessing student learning. The framework includes: a) assessment vocabulary; b) implementation processes, and 3) methods for data generation and reporting. The goals is to, besides providing this formal structure, to establish a common language so that all the assessment stakeholders could understand each other well when communicating.
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69. Linn, M. and Chiu, J. Winter 2011. Combining learning and assessment to improve science education.
This articles examines high-stakes testing and implications to science education offering alternative assessment to gauge student learning.
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70. Lowenthal, P., White, J. J., & Cooley, K. 2011. Remake/remodel: Using ePortfolios and a system of gates to improve student assessment and program evaluation.

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71. Maki, P. 2010. Coming to terms with student outcomes assessment: Faculty and administrators' journeys to integrating assessment in their work and institutional culture.
Written by faculty and administrators who have served on the front lines of their institutions' efforts to integrate assessment into institutional life, this book consists of 14 essays describing the assessment journey. Integrated into each essay are lessons learned and reflections designing and implementing an effective and useful assessment process.
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72. Maki, P. L. 2004. Assessing for learning, building a sustainable commitment across the institution.
This book offers colleges and universities a framework and tools to design an effective and collaborative assessment process appropriate for their culture and institution. It encapsulates the approach that Peggy Maki has developed and refined through the hundreds of successful workshops she has presented nationally and internationally.
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73. Malcom, L., Bensimon, E. M., & Dávila, B. 2010, Winter. (Re)constructing hispanic-serving institutions: Moving beyond numbers towards student success.
This brief highlights the purpose and need for Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs). One of the main questions asked is “What evidence is used to assess performance as a Hispanic-serving institution?” (p. 5). The major goals of the brief include: “1) attending to their mission and identity in order to develop programmatic initiatives that promote Latino/a student success, and 2) focusing on collecting data to assess the extent HSIs are meeting their mission to improve educational outcomes for Latino students” (p. 1).
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74. McInerney, D. M., Brown, G. T. L., & Liem, G. A. D. 2009. Student perspectives on assessment: What students can tell us about assessment for learning.
Seeking diverse student voices on assessment? This books uses American, and international student feedback on both formative and summative assessment across all levels of education.
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75. McKitrick, S. A., & Barnes, S. M. 2012. Assessment of critical thinking: An evolutionary approach.
Binghamton university was required by the SUNY Board of Trustees to use critical-thinking learning goals and to select a method of critical-thinking assessment. Campuses were also required to submit to SUNY a plan for assessing critical thinking which SUNY would approve through collaboration with the General Education Assessment Review (GEAR) group. . GEAR was formed by SUNY to develop a critical-thinking rubric with faculty help. Campuses were given the freedom to select from a narrow range of strategies for assessing critical thinking (Faculty Delphi study; NSSE surveys). Binghamton chose the GEAR rubric. The strategy was implemented and composed of 3 stages: developmental, enculturation, and refinement stage.
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76. Mentkowski, M., & Associates. 2000. Learning that lasts: Integrating learning, development, and performance in college and beyond.
Today's colleges and universities face increasing pressure to develop programs and curricula that will teach students how to handle what it means for learners to transform themselves and for educators to foster essential skills for learning, leading, teamwork, and adapting with integrity in college and beyond. The authors draw from two decades of longitudinal studies on student learning in the acclaimed curriculum at Alverno College—and on leading educational theories—to present a theory of deep and durable learning.
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77. Millet, C. M., Payne, D. G., Dwyer, C. A., Stickler, L. M., & Alexiou, J. J. 2008. A culture of evidence: An evidence-centered approach to accountability for student learning outcomes.
This paper presents a framework that institutions of higher education can use to improve, revise and introduce comprehensive systems for the collection and dissemination of information on student learning outcomes. For faculty and institutional leaders grappling with the many issues and nuances inherent in assessing student learning, the framework offers a practical approach that allows them to meet demands for accountability in ways that respect the diverse attributes of students, faculty and the institutions themselves.
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78. Millet, C. M., Stickler, L. M., Payne, D. G. & Dwyer, C. A. 2007. A culture of evidence: Critical features of assessments for postsecondary student learning.
This paper reviews "review the major tools in use today for assessing student learning and student engagement, an important aspect of the educational environment. The goal of this review is to provide a high-level overview of the major assessment tools so that higher education stakeholders can continue the national dialogue with even greater understanding of the current state of the art tools in assessing student learning in higher education. This paper provides an overview at the “30,000-foot level,” which we believe will be useful to policymakers, national organizations, and two- and four-year college and university presidents and provosts."
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79. Mislevy, R. J., Almond, R. G., & Lukas, J. F. 2003. A brief introduction to evidence-centered design.
One approach to assessment is evidence-centered assessment design (ECD). This report describes the basics of ECD and presents information on a framework and possibly delivery systems using ECD.
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80. Morelon, C. 2006. Building institutional capacity for informed decision making to enhance student learning outcomes.
Although a good deal has been written on accountability, accreditation, assessment, and institutional effectiveness, there is a dearth of examples from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) about how they use these processes for institutional improvement. Given the press for institutions to provide evidence of their impact on student learning, resource-dependent HBCUs are challenged to meet such demands. The purpose of this research was to better understand factors that compelled one institution to become more data-centered in its decision making in order to affect student learning outcomes.
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81. Museus, S. D. 2007. Using qualitative methods to assess diverse institutional cultures.
"This chapter focuses on describing how institutional researchers can use qualitative cultural assessments to better understand the role that their campuses play in shaping individual and group behaviors and experiences. A special emphasis is given to the implications of institutional diversity in the processes of designing and conducting assessments of institutional cultures." (p. 30)
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82. National Research Council. 2001. Knowing what students know: The science and design of educational assessment.
Seeking to understand the role of cognitive and measurement science advances on assessment? This report by the National Research Council tackles these issues and more in this report examining the science of learning.
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83. New Leadership Alliance for Student Learning and Accountability. 2012. Committing to quality: Guidelines for assessment and accountability in higher education .
This publication guides colleges and universities in improving the quality of a college degree. It asks colleges to take responsibility for assessing and improving student learning — to set clear goals for student achievement, regularly gather and use evidence that measures performance against those goals, report evidence of student learning, and continuously work to improve results.
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84. Nyamekye, A. September 2011. Putting myself to the test.
In a routine evaluation, my principal praised my organization, management, and facilitation, but posed the following question: “How do you know the kids are really getting it?” She urged me to develop more-rigorous assessments of student learning. Ego and uncertainty inspired me to measure the impact of my instruction. I thought I was effective, but I wanted proof.
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85. Ortlieb, E., & Cheek, E. H. 2012, March. Using informative assessments towards effective literacy instruction.
Examples of effective literacy assessment practices for different student populations are offered in this book.
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86. Perks, J. M., & Galantino, M. L. 2013. The development of an ePortfolio as a capstone in a holistic health minor.
The authors describes exploring whether to use an ePortfolio assessment as a capstone project for a Holistic Health Minor (HHM) in an undergraduate program. A team of faculty designed a template and a group of nine seniors piloted the program. The authors found the interdisciplinary faculty team to be vital for the program’s success.
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87. Provezis, S., & Jankowski, N. 2011. Presenting learning outcomes assessment results to foster use.
A chapter on NILOA's Transparency Framework regarding institutional transparency and public reporting.
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88. Provezis, S., Jankowski, N. May 2011. NILOA transparency framework: A tool for transparent communication of assessment information.
Presentation at The Association for the Assessment of Learning in Higher Education (AALHE) on Student Learning Assessment Components with examples.
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89. Puncochar, J., & Klett, M. (2013). A model for outcomes assessment of undergraduate science knowledge and inquiry processes.
To measure the efficacy of a Liberal Studies education, a Midwestern regional university developed a systematic, rubric-guided assessment based on nationally recognized science principles and inquiry processes to evaluate student work in undergraduate science laboratory courses relative to a liberal education. The rubric presented a direct measure of student understandings of science inquiry processes. The assessment procedure used stratified random sampling at confidence levels of 95% to select student work, maintained anonymity of students and faculty, addressed concerns of university faculty, and completed a continuous improvement feedback loop by informing faculty of assessment results to assess and refine science-inquiry processes of course content. The procedure resulted in an assessment system for benchmarking science inquiry processes evident in student work and offered insights into the effect of undergraduate science laboratory courses on student knowledge and understanding.
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90. Ramírez, K. 2011. ePerformance: Crafting, rehearsing, and presenting the ePortfolio persona.
ePerformance: Crafting, Rehearsing, and Presenting the ePortfolio Persona exposes vital intersections between pedagogy and performance to reveal how using ePortfolio encourages not only student-centered learning, but facilitates collaboration through cooperative exchanges. Productive interactivity with audiences who actively influence process, content, and outcomes displaces classroom hierarchies and the passive absorption of predetermined material. It is the powerful intersection of multiple modes of performance that establishes the ePortfolio medium as an elastic, ultra-accessible theatrical arena in which students may create, rehearse, and present themselves. By recognizing that they are not only at the center of learning, but that they are one of multiple centers in a multicentric teaching and learning dynamic, students activate the discourse of which their work is already a part.
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91. Richards-Schuster, K., Ruffolo, M. C., Nicoll, K. L., Distelrath, C., & Galura, J.A. 2014. Using ePortfolios to assess program goals, integrative learning, and civic engagement: A case example.
Analyzing 51 student ePortfolios from a capstone class for an Interdisciplinary Community Action and Social Change minor, the authors share results on how ePortfolios can be utilized to assess civic engagement. The authors also reveal the program’s impact.
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92. Ridley, D.R., & Smith, E.D. (2006). Writing across the curriculum works: The impact of writing emphasis upon senior exit writing samples.
Seniors’ writing skills were assessed in 1998 at a medium-sized public university. Blind scoring, a standard scoring guide, and trained graders were used. Curricular writing emphasis was assessed through a syllabus study, yielding a Curricular Emphasis Score. Controlling for entry-level skill in writing, Writing Score and Curricular Emphasis were highly correlated.
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93. Riordan, T. 2005. Education for the 21st century: Teaching, learning, and assessment.
We may never reach agreement on all of the dimensions of learning that are integral to an undergraduate education, but there is obviously growing consensus on some of those dimensions. In any case, students will learn more effectively when we have made clear at our own institutions and in our programs not just what they will study but how they will be able to act and think as a result of their education. While there is room, indeed a need, in our teaching practice for a wide variety of pedagogies, those that engage students in the active practice of the disciplines are truer to the spirit of the learning we desire for our students. The same goes for assessment of student learning. All teachers evaluate their students; the key is to develop means of evaluation that truly assess the kind of learning discussed here.
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94. Salisbury, M. Delicious ambiguity.
This blog is the second generation of Delicious Ambiguity, a weekly column that started in the fall of 2011 in the faculty newsletter at Augustana College. The whole idea was to help the college and everyone here who works with students to think about our student data as a means to improve student learning and the educational experience rather than just seeing the data as an ends in and of itself. Even though the first year of columns was published as separate pages in an online newsletter, all of the them have been uploaded to this blog site.
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95. Schuh, J. H. & Gansemer-Topf, A. M. December 2010. The role of student affairs in student learning assessment.
Student affairs professionals are expected to be knowledgeable about the student experience. Thus, it follows that they can and should play an important role in assessing student learning. We hope this paper will persuade faculty and institutional leaders that student affairs staff with the requisite expertise should be involved in collecting, interpreting, and using evidence of student learning for both accountability and improvement.
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96. Seymour, D., Everhart, D., & Yoshino, K. 2015. The Currency of Higher Education: Credits and Competencies.
With a focus on competency-based education (CBE), this report highlights the challenges associated with developing a program that moves away from the credit-hour standard.
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97. Shulman, L. S. 2007. Counting and recounting: Assessment and the quest for accountability.
Sulman questions how assessments are presented. "How and what we choose to count and the manner in which we array and display our accounts is a form of narrative—legitimately, necessarily, and inevitably" (p.20).
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98. Silva, M. L., Delaney, S. A., Cochran, J., Jackson, R., & Olivares, C. 2015. Institutional assessment and the integrative core curriculum: Involving students in the development of an ePortfolio system.
Because students are often not involved nor included in the decision-making assessment process, the authors piloted a project to include students as co-authors and research assistants to improve their ePortfolio design. The authors purport that students can and should be included in decision-making assessment processes.
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99. Smith, B. P. 2007. Student ratings of teaching effectiveness: An analysis of end-of-course faculty evaluations .
The purpose of this study was to describe student ratings of teaching effectiveness for faculty in the College of Education (COE) at a Research I institution in the Southern United States.
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100. Snider-Lotz, T. G. 2002. Designing an evidence-centered assessment program.
Additional information on evidence-centered assessment programs and design may be found here: http://ecd.sri.com/
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101. Southern Education Foundation. 2010. Still striving: Trustees and presidents of historically black colleges and universities’ unprecedented dialogue about governance and accreditation.
As a result of a SACS meeting in which HBCU presidents, chancellors, trustees and education scholars were invited to speak on governance and accreditation, this paper "captures exchanges of ideas and information about matters such as Board/executive relations, financial management, policymaking and oversight strategies and is “must” reading for anyone who wants to learn about best practices in higher education governance and how accrediting agencies function" (SEF, 2011).
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102. Springfield, E., Gwozdek, A., & Smiler, A.P. 2015. Transformation rubric for engaged learning: A tool and method for measuring life-changing experiences.
This paper shares how the Transformation Rubric for Engaged Learning is an effective assessment tool in relation to ePortfolios, including how it can be replicated and used in a variety of current assessment methods.
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103. Sullivan, T. A., Mackie, C., Massy, W. F., & Sinha, E. 2012. Improving measurement of productivity in higher education.
A report recently released by the National Research Council titled, "Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education," discusses various ways to measure institutional quality and college productivity.
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104. Teitelbaum, E. October 2016. Involving students and their perspectives: A student panel discussion.
This session had a student panel and touched on bridging the divide between the practice of assessment on the part of faculty and administrators and the lived experience of assessment on the part of students.
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105. The Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement National Task Force. 2012. A crucible moment: College learning and democracy's future.
The importance of civic learning in colleges and universities is the focus of this report. A civic institutional matrix for institutional use is included.
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106. Vorhees, R. A. 2001. Competency-based learning models: A necessary future.
This essay focuses on the present and proposed usages of competency-based learning models internationally and nationally. Furthermore, the author calls for a common lexicon for the usage of compentencies and the thoughtful usage of competentices to encourage a paradigmatic shift.
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107. Vuong, B., & Hairston, C. C. 2012, October. Using data to improve Minority-Serving Institution success.
This brief highlights how MSIs from the Lumina MSI-Models of Success project have used data to implement policy and programmatic changes on their campuses in support of student and institutional success.
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108. Waters, J. K. . 2014. Adaptive learning: Are we there yet?.
This article offers a brief background into what adaptive learning is, and then dives right into seeing the concept in action. While the focus is on assessment driven learning in the K-12 sector, this type of adaptive learning holds interest for the collegiate level, as well.
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109. Weiner, L. and Bresciani, M. Winter 2011. Can institutions have quality programming without utilizing a systemic outcomes-based assessment process?.
For many students, service learning not only expands their educational horizons, but also makes them more aware and compassionate of those who live in communities very different from their own. Yet, despite the expressed benefits of service learning and the increasing numbers of institutions offering service-learning programs, it is not known whether they are truly successful unless evidence of their success is provided. The use of outcomes-based assessment is one of the processes that generates evidence of program effectiveness. Few studies have been performed to identify whether all the components of effective outcomes-based assessment must be present in order for quality programs to be identified. Thus, the purpose of this cross-case comparative study was to find out necessary components.
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110. WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies (WCET). 2010. No significant difference.
This website has been designed to serve as a companion piece to Thomas L. Russell's book, "The No Significant Difference Phenomenon" (2001, IDECC, fifth edition). Mr. Russell's book is a fully indexed, comprehensive research bibliography of 355 research reports, summaries and papers that document no significant differences (NSD) in student outcomes between alternate modes of education delivery, with a foreword by Dr. Richard E. Clark. Previous editions of the book were provided electronically; the fifth edition is the first to be made available in print from IDECC (The International Distance Education Certification Center).
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