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Search returned 80 results using Keyword: "Faculty Engagement"



1. Carnegie Knowledge Network.
The Carnegie Knowledge Network seeks to provide education policymakers and practitioners with timely, authoritative research and information on the use of value-added methodologies and other metrics in teacher evaluation systems.
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2. Quality matters.
An online subscription service that seeks to improve online education in multiple educational contexts, from K-12 to higher education. Located on the site is a host of resources that reflect a faculty focused approach towards evaluating student learning in online courses. Among other things, the site contains resources regarding workshops, faculty-centered models for online learning in addition to research reports.
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3. Tuning.
TUNING started in 2000 as a project in Europe linked to the Bologna Process and Lisbon Strategy. It has developed into a process that can be applied to educational programs to develop, implement, and evaluate quality of degree programs. The process employs faculty meeting within disciplines to discuss learning outcomes. It was developed by and for higher education institutions.
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4. AAC&U. Summer/Fall 2005. Integrative learning.
This edition of Peer Review focuses on the usage of integrative learning as a tool for building connectedness in student learning.
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5. Adelman, C. 2015, February. To Imagine a Verb: The Language and Syntax of Learning Outcomes Statements.
This Occasional Paper, focused on syntax and semantics, provides language-centered principles, guidelines and tools for writing student learning outcome statements. While placing the verb at the center of all student learning outcomes, it distinguishes between active and operational verbs, voting for the latter on the grounds that they are more likely to lead, naturally and logically, to assignments that allow genuine judgment of student performance, and offers, as more constructive cores of student learning outcomes, 20 sets of operational verbs corresponding to cognitive activities in which students engage and faculty seek to elicit.
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6. Anderson, L. & Krathwohl, D.R. 2001. A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives.
Building from Bloom's taxonomy, this book offers a two-dimensional framework in hopes of improving teaching and students outcomes. A series of vignettes written by and for teachers illustrate how to use this ground-breaking framework which provides teachers with a tool to help them make sense of objectives and to organize them so they are clearly understood and fairly easy to implement.
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7. Appling, J., Gancar, J., Hughes, S., & Saad, A. 2012. Class syllabi, general education, and ePortfolios.

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8. Association for Institutional Research. 2009. A ten-step process for creating outcomes assessment measures for an undergraduate management program: A faculty-driven process.
This paper offers a plan for involving department faculty members in the creation of outcomes assessment by borrowing from the current literature in the field, as well as literature from human resources development and organizational behavior.
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9. Association of American Colleges and Universities. 2015. Scientific Thinking and Integrative Reasoning Skills (STIRS) Case Studies.
AAC&U has released 16 new case studies under their Scientific Thinking and Integrative Reasoning Skills (STIRS) initiative. Each case study consists of a student case and facilitator’s guide, to aid faculty with incorporating assignments and modules that engage students in integrative and problem-based inquiry.
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10. Baker, G. R. February 2012. North Carolina A&T State University: A culture of inquiry.
North Carolina A&T was selected for inclusion as a case study for NILOA due to its commitment to improving its campus by developing a "culture of inquiry"—specifically as this relates to student learning outcomes assessment activities. Three elements have been instrumental in A&T's drive to become a more data-driven institution: 1) administrative leadership that encourages discussions and collaboration around student learning outcomes assessment activities on campus; 2) the use of professional development opportunities to help foster the involvement and commitment of faculty members; and 3) the systematic and intentional use of student feedback.
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11. Baker, G. R. April 2012. Texas A&M International University: A culture of assessment INTEGRATEd.
Texas A&M International University was selected as a NILOA case study institution due to 1) its commitment to choosing assessments and tools appropriate for its students, 2) its long history with and innovative approach to assessment, and 3) the influential role of professional development at the institution to help prepare “Assessment Champions” and expand the number of “pockets of excellence” in terms of assessment practices throughout the campus.
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12. Banta, T. W. (Ed.). 1999. Portfolio assessment: Uses, cases, scoring, and impact.
"This booklet's articles explore how portfolios, including Web-based portfolios, have been used at various institutions to assess and improve programs in general education, the major, advising, and overall institutional effectiveness. They describe ways portfolios can be scored, students' perspectives on portfolios, how portfolios changed the faculty culture at one college, and more."
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13. Banta, T.W., Griffin, M., Flateby, T.L., & Kahn, S. December 2009. Three promising alternatives for assessing college students' knowledge and skills.
In this paper, assessment experts Trudy Banta, Merilee Griffin, Theresa Flateby, and Susan Kahn describe the development of several promising authentic assessment approaches. The contributors draw on their rich assessment experience to illustrate how portfolios, common analytic rubrics, and online assessment communities can more effectively link assessment practices to pedagogy. In addition to discussing the strengths and limitations of each approach, the paper offers concrete examples of how these authentic approaches are being used to guide institutional improvement, respond to accountability questions, and involve more faculty, staff, and students in meaningful appraisals of learning outcomes.
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14. Bender, E., & Gray, D. 1999. The scholarship of teaching.
The authors provide a short essay expressing the need for scholarship into university teaching and students learning.
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15. Berg, J., Grimm, L. M., Wigmore, D., Cratsley, C. K., Slotnick, R. C., & Taylor, S. . 2014, Summer. Quality Collaborative to Assess Quantitative Reasoning: Adapting the LEAP VALUE Rubric and the DQP.
Fitchburg State University (FSU) and Mount Wachusett Community College (MWCC) worked together to evaluate their rubrics of quantitative reasoning- and three other areas- and compare it with the DQP's and LEAP's. The aim is to develop common rubrics to measure what students know and should do, which in turn should work towards setting common expectations for transfer students.
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16. Bresciani, M. 2006. Outcomes-based academic and co-curricular program review: A compilation of institutional good practices.
This book, intended for faculty, administrators, and staff, explains how sustaintable outcomes-based assessment programs are created and maintained.
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17. Breslow, L., Lienhard, J., Masi, B., Seering, W., & Ulm, F. 2008. How do we know if students are learning?.
This Massachusetts Institute of Technology faculty newsletter reported the efforts by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), departments in the School of Engineering (SoE), and the School’s Director of Education Innovation and Assessment towards assessing their students’ learning outcomes. The newsletter covers the multi-perspective approach that was taken to account for student learning outcomes, including both top-down and bottom–up approaches of assessing student learning. Engineering faculty were also engaged in a process of determining some of the most effective methods for assessing their students learning outcomes, including conducting experiments with the guidance of the school’s Teaching and Learning Laboratory (TTL).
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18. Brophy, J.E. 2010. Motivating students to learn.
From the Publisher: “Written specifically for teachers, this book offers a wealth of research-based principles for motivating students to learn. Its focus on motivational principles rather than motivation theorists or theories leads naturally into discussion of specific classroom strategies. Throughout the book these principles and strategies are tied to the realities of contemporary schools (e.g., curriculum goals) and classrooms (e.g., student differences, classroom dynamics). The author employs an eclectic approach to motivation that shows how to effectively integrate the use of extrinsic and intrinsic strategies. Guidelines are provided for adapting motivational principles to group and individual differences and for doing 'repair work' with students who have become discouraged or disaffected learners.”
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19. Brown, G. 2004. How Students Learn, Supplement to the Routledge Falmer Key Guides for Effective Teaching in Higher Education Series.
Written to provide an understanding of theories of student learning and including a list of useful additional readings at the end, this resource serves as basis for understanding the Key Guides in Effective Teaching in Higher Education series.
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20. Cain, T., & Hutchings, P. 2013, October. Faculty buy-in and engagement: Reframing the conversation around faculty roles in assessment.
This presentation from the 2013 Assessment Institute discusses faculty's engagement with assessment, including common challenges, sources of discontent, and solutions for overcoming these difficulties.
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21. Carey, S. J. (Ed.) . Winter 2010. Engaging departments: Assessing student learning .
Peer Review is a quarterly magazine put out by the AAC&U on trends and debates in undergraduate liberal education. This issue focuses on departmental learning assessment, drawing from the 2009 Engaging Departments Institute.
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22. Carey, S. J. (Ed.). 2015. Faculty leadership for integrative liberal learning.
This issue, sponsored by the Teagle and Mellon foundations, offers insights about the central role of faculty in galvanizing the necessary experiences that cross disciplines, units, and campus boundaries to promote integrative learning.
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23. Case, S. 2007. Reconfiguring and realigning the assessment feedback processes for an undergraduate criminology degree.
The author conducted this study with a question of how to streamline the assessment process while still maximizing student learning benefits. So, the question aimed to symbiotically merge explicit engagement with assessment criteria and constructive feedback. A reconfigured system was adopted as a standard at the Criminology department.
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24. Cook-Sather, A., Bovill, C., & Felten, P. 2014. Engaging students as partners in learning and teaching: A guide for faculty.
This text offers practical advice to faculty and administrators on creating effective ways of engaging students.
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25. Davis Sr., L. 2009. Still striving: The role of faculty and staff in the SACS accreditation process.
Involvement of faculty and staff in the accreditation process has never been more important. Without their involvement, student learning outcomes and therefore, quality education cannot properly be addressed. This goal of this paper is “to encourage HBCU faculty and staff to embrace their roles in relation to accreditation and better understand SACS’ requirements and points of emphasis” (p. 3).
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26. Deardorff, D. 2014, Spring. Outcomes Assessment in International Education.
This paper from International Higher Education is for international educators on assessment.
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27. Denecke, D. D., Kent, J., & Wiener, W. 2011. Preparing Future Faculty to Assess Student Learning: A report on a CGS project supported by a grant from the Teagle Foundation.
This report provides a broad overview of national needs in the assessment of student learning and gaps in existing future faculty preparation programs.
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28. Dilworth, Mary E., Ed. 1992. Diversity in Teacher Education: New Expectations.
This book explains the steps teacher educators and policymakers must take in order to prepare a teaching force that is both culturally diverse and culturally aware.
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29. Driscoll, A. & Wood, S. 2007. Developing outcomes-based assessment for learner-centered education: A faculty introduction.
This book attempts to explain how faculty can comfortably use outcomes-based assessment within their own instruction. The author navigates readers through the process of creating expectations, standards and criteria, and course alignment to desired outcomes. articulating expectations, defining criteria and standards, and aligning course content consistently with desired outcomes
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30. Ellsworth, J.B. 2000. Surviving change: A survey of educational change models.
This book presents a theoretical road map for teachers, professors, or administrators who seek guidance from the educational change literature. The introduction presents an overview of assumptions, early traditions of change research, other reviews of change research, and practical application of education change theory.
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31. Ewell, P., Paulson, K., & Kinzie, J. June 2011. Down and in: Assessment practices at the program level.
To follow up the 2009 National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) report on institutional assessment activity described by chief academic officers, NILOA surveyed program heads in the two and four-year sectors to gain a more complete picture of assessment activity at the program or department level.
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32. Farmer, D. W. 1993, Jan/Feb. Course-embedded assessment: A teaching strategy to improve student learning.
Using King’s College as an example, Farmer discusses how students and faculty are involved in assessment activities.
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33. Gabriel, K.F. 2008. Teaching unprepared students: Strategies for promoting success and retention in higher education.
This book offers practical advice for professors and teaching assistants working with underprepared students.
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34. Gallagher, C. W. 2014, December. Disrupting the Game-Changer: Remembering the History of Competency-Based Education.
Gallagher explores the history and current developments of competency-based education (CBE), while drawing attention to the issues that affected the movement in its early stages. The report draws on faculty concerns, quality of education, and student learning to discuss CBE programs.
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35. Gerretson, H., & Golson, E. 2005. Synopsis of the use of course-embedded assessment in a medium sized public university’s general education program.
Gerretson and Golson describe the use of a faculty-driven course-embedded assessment at a medium-size public university. The authors offer an overview on course-embedded assessment, implementing learning outcomes, rubrics, the use of data analysis, and evaluating the effectiveness of the course-embedded approach.
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36. Gerretson, H., & Golson, E. 2005. Synopsis of the use of course-embedded assessment in a medium sized public university's general education program.
Gerretson and Golson describe the use of a faculty-driven course-embedded assessment at a medium size public university. The authors offer an overview on course-embedded assessment, implementing learning outcomes, rubrics, the use of data analysis, and evaluating the effectiveness of the course-embedded approach.
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37. Goff, L., Potter, M. K., Pierre, E., Carey, T., Gullage, A., et al. 2015, March. Learning Outcomes Assessment: A Practitioner’s Handbook.
This handbook from the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) serves as a resource for faculty and administrators to design and assess program-level learning outcomes. The handbook includes tips, examples and case studies, and recommendations on methods for developing program-level learning outcomes and assessment.
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38. Gold, L., Rhoades, G., Smith, M. & Kuh, G. May 2011. What faculty unions say about student learning outcomes assessment.
This paper summarizes the views on student learning outcomes assessment held by the leadership of three major national faculty unions—the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), and the National Education Association (NEA). Framed as a conversation, a spokesperson from each group talks about how organized faculties can contribute their ideas and fashion their practices to enhance student learning and educational attainment.
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39. Graduate Student Instructor: Teaching & Resource Center. Learning: Theory and research.
This website offers extensive material on the cognition of learning; from theories of learning to methods of instruction, and from principles of memory to the role of motivation. The site has various resources (i.e. the PQ4R method and the practice guide to improve student learning) and defines key terminology en route to developing a useful resource for practitioners and students alike.
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40. Gurung, R. A. R., & Wilson, J. H. (Eds.). 2013. Doing the scholarship of teaching and learning: Measuring systematic changes to teaching and improvements in learning.
This special issue by the Journal of New Directions for Teaching and Learning directly addresses the questions of why and how to approach the field of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. In particular, it seeks to close the gap between teachers, researchers, faculty and administrators who are interested in joining the field and how to conduct Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. The issue covers questions regarding how to design, write up and publish such scholarship in addition to understanding some of the requirements for such research to get IRB approval. This is a great resource for all members of the education community who are interested in getting involved in Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.
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41. Hawthorne, J., & Kelsch, A. 2012. Closing the loop: How an assessment project paved the way for GE reform.
Highlights an University of North Dakota (UND) assessment project rooted in five "actionable" principles: a) the need for scholarly credibility (assessment is perceived as scholarly in method and conception), b) authenticity (the degree to which the data generated feel "real" or "true"); c) keeping it local (grounded in a specific campus context); d) a faculty-owned project, and e) driven by genuine inquiry.
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42. Huber, M. T., & Hutchings, P. 2005. The advancement of learning: Building the teaching commons.
In this book, the authors explore the history of the scholarship of teaching and learning as well as provide examples of good practices. Resources and supports needed to sustain the scholarship of teaching and learning for faculty are also provided.
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43. Hutchings, P. 2011, Sept. 22. From departmental to disciplinary assessment: Deepening faculty engagement.
Most of assessment's attention over the last two decades has been aimed at cross-cutting outcomes--critical and analytical thinking, problem solving, quantitative literacy, and communication--that are typically identified with general education. Just about everyone agrees that abilities like these are essential markers of higher learning; critical thinking typically tops the list of faculty priorities for student learning, regardless of field or institutional type. They're also the outcomes that have caught the attention of employers and policymakers (as well as test makers)--who are not, for the most part, asking how well students understand art history, sociology, or criminal justice (though they "are" asking about math and science preparation). And of course they are outcomes that overlap with those of the disciplines. In short, assessment's focus on cross-cutting outcomes makes perfect sense, but it has also meant that the assessment of students' knowledge and abilities "within" particular fields, focused on what is "distinctive" to the field, has received less attention. And that's too bad. In this article, the author reviews the current state of affairs in departmental and disciplinary assessment, and points to emerging developments that can help to deepen faculty engagement with questions about how and how well students achieve the learning valued within and across diverse fields.
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44. Hutchings, P. April 2010. Opening doors to faculty involvement in assessment.
Much of what has been done in the name of assessment has failed to induce large numbers of faculty to systematically collect and use evidence of student learning to improve teaching and enhance student performance. Pat Hutchings, a senior associate at The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, examines the dynamics behind this reality, including the mixed origins of assessment, coming both from within and outside academe, and the more formidable obstacles that stem from the culture and organization of higher education itself. Then, she describes six ways to bring the purposes of assessment and the regular work of faculty closer together, which may make faculty involvement more likely and assessment more useful.
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45. Hutchings, P. April 2011. What new faculty need to know about assessment.
As a new faculty member, you will have questions about your students’ learning—as all thoughtful teachers do: Are they really learning what I’m teaching? How well do they understand the key concepts I’m focusing on? Can they apply what they’re learning in new contexts? What can I do better or differently to help students develop the skills and knowledge they need to be effective in this class, in subsequent courses, and in their future life and work? This assessment brief focuses upon an introduction for faculty to assessment of student learning.
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46. Hutchings, P. July 2016. Assessment and integrative learning.
At this LiveText Conference, Pat Hutchings discusses engaging faculty to make assessment matter to students.
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47. Hutchings, P., Jordan-Fleming, M. K., & Green, K. October 2016. Using intentionally designed assignments to foster and assess student learning.
This session will explore the benefits – and some of the challenges – of bringing educators together to collaborate on the design and use of the projects, papers, exams, and presentations they require of their students.
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48. Jankowski, N. July 2011. Juniata College: Faculty led assessment.
Juniata College was identified as an example of good assessment practice for the faculty-led Center for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL Center) that champions and supports evidence-based teaching; an administration-supported accountability website that provides data and information about outcomes to multiple audiences; and the use of evidence of student learning to make improvements at the institution and individual course levels.
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49. Jankowski, N. April 2012. St. Olaf College: Utilization-Focused Assessment.
The National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) selected St. Olaf as a case study institution due to the institutional framing of assessment as inquiry in support of student learning and as meaningful, manageable, and mission-driven; the utilization-focus/backward-design approach employed in assessment; the integration of student learning outcomes assessment processes into faculty governance structures; and the collaborative involvement of multiple stakeholders and diverse ways in which evidence of student learning is utilized throughout the institution.
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50. Jankowski, N., Kinzie, J., & Kuh, G. 2014, January 24. What provosts say about student learning outcomes asssessment.
This presentation from the 2014 AAC&U Annual Meeting presents an overview of NILOA's 2014 provost survey.
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51. Kimberly D. Tanner. 2012, Summer. Promoting Student Metacognition.
This paper discusses various ways instructors can integrate/teach metacognitive strategies in their class, and how metacognition can help faculty, as well. Metacognition can promote conceptual changes in students, improve thinking skills, and result in better academic performance.
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52. Kinzie, J. June 2012. Carnegie Mellon University: Fostering assessment for improvement and teaching excellence.
Carnegie Mellon was selected as a case study for the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) for having an approach to student learning outcomes assessment that reflects the institution’s commitment to interdisciplinarity and innovative teaching and learning. Three elements have been instrumental in CMU’s advances in program-level student learning outcomes assessment: 1) an institutionalized research-oriented and data-informed university decision-making process driven by deans and departments; 2) an organizational culture with established processes promoting continuous improvement; and 3) the elevation of a cross-campus faculty resource—the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence—as the hub of assessment support. This case study broadly describes CMU’s approach to addressing the challenges of assessment, explores the salient elements of CMU’s culture for assessment and improvement, and then focuses on the positioning and role of the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence in student learning outcomes.
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53. Kinzie, J. August 2011. Colorado State University: A comprehensive continuous improvement system.
Colorado State University was determined to be an instructive case study because of its innovative learning outcomes assessment and institutional improvement activities have been highlighted in various publications (see Bender, 2009; Bender, Johnson, & Siller, 2010; Bender & Siller, 2006, 2009; McKelfresh & Bender, 2009) and have been noted by experts in assessment and accreditation. CSU's assessment effort in student affairs is a model for bridging the work of academic affairs and student affairs through student learning outcomes assessment. Over the last dozen years, CSU has expanded its continuous improvement system for managing information sharing to serve the decision-making and reporting needs of various audiences. This system—known as the CSU Plan for Researching Improvement and Supporting Mission, or PRISM—provides information on the university's performance in prioritized areas, uses a peer review system for feedback, and emphasizes the importance of documenting institutional improvements informed by
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54. Kinzie, J. October 2010. Perspectives from campus leaders on the current state of student learning outcomes assessment: NILOA focus group summary 2009-2010.
This paper highlights lessons from four focus group sessions with campus leaders--presidents, provosts, academic deans and directors of institutional research from a variety of two- and four-year institutions-- regarding their perspectives on the state of learning assessment practices on their campuses.
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55. Kinzie, J., & Lindsay, N. 2014, February 28. Assessment administrators anonymous: 12 steps for involving faculty in assessment.
This presentation from the 2014 AAC&U General Education and Assessment Meeting discusses the role of faculty in assessment and presents results of NILOA's 2009 and 2014 provost surveys.
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56. Kuh, G., & Ikenberry, S. October 2009. More than you think, less than we need: Learning outcomes assessment in American higher education.
The 2009 report from the National Institute of Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) is based on information from more than 1,500 regionally accredited degree-granting institutions in the U.S. The NILOA study, titled “More Than You Think, Less Than We Need: Learning Outcomes Assessment in American Higher Education,” summarizes what colleges and universities are doing to measure student learning.
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57. Lakin, M. B., Seymour, D., Nellum, C. J., & Crandall, J. R. 2015. Credit for Prior Learning: Charting Institutional Practice for Sustainability.
This report focuses on credit for prior learning (CPL) and addresses the barriers and successful strategies for incorporating CPL.
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58. Levine, A. 1997. How the academic profession is changing.
This article explores forces that are changing the academic profession across various higher education sectors. Evidence is presented from the 1995-1996 HERI Faculty Survey, as well as other sources.
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59. Lindholm, J.A., Szelenyi, K. 2008. Faculty time stress: Correlates within and across academic disciplines.
"This study examined the determinants of time stress among a national sample of faculty." Access to this article is through the Taylor & Francis Group, and may require a login.
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60. Liu, M. Sep/Oct2011. Junior faculty members' involvement in university assessment.
Abstract: The article offers information on the involvement of junior faculty members in university assessment. It explores interviews with five junior faculty members wherein the faculties interviewed mentioned that they have different levels and forms of involvement in the assessment process of their department. It states that junior faculty members can play active roles in improving the assessment practices within the programs of colleges and universities.
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61. Lowood, J. 2013. Restructuring the Writing Program at Berkeley City College: Or how we learned to love assessment and use it to improve student learning.
The portfolio-based assessment program at BCC started in 2011. They first looked at their pre-transfer English and English as a Second Language (ESL) composition/reading classes learning outcomes and determined that the best way to assess if they were met was through portfolios. As a results, all students had to summarize readings, write an in-class essay based on a prompt, and a research paper. About 500 students were assessed per semester. The endeavor extended so much so that the entire English and English as a Second Language (ESL) Department participated in scoring the portfolios through a rubric design.
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62. Maki, P. 2010. Coming to terms with student outcomes assessment.
This book is intended for those skeptical of the process of building a culture of assessment at their post-secondary institution. It presents the unvarnished first-person accounts of fourteen faculty and administrators about how they grappled, and engaged, with assessment and how – despite misgivings and an often-contentious process – they were able to gain the collaboration of their peers as the benefits for student learning became evident.
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63. Miller, R. 2007. Assessment in cycles of improvement: Faculty designs for essential learning outcomes. .
This publication features a series of reports on how selected colleges and universities foster and assess student learning in twelve liberal education outcome areas, including writing, quantitative literacy, critical thinking, ethics, intercultural knowledge, and information literacy. Moving from goals to experiences, assessments, and improvements driven by assessment data, each institutional story illustrates how complex learning can be shaped over time and across programs to bring students to higher levels of achievement of these important outcomes.
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64. Newstok, S. 2013. A plea for ‘close learning’.
In this article, Newstok argues that despite the celebratory discussions regarding Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), the field of higher education should not move away from the traditional understanding of teachers and students as being in close proximity with one another. It is this “personalized element” that Newstok points out as fundamental to any sense of caring and quality education. While technology has a role, it should not disrupt the “close learning” between a teacher and a student.
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65. Nichols, M., Comer, J., Recker, D., & Hathcoat, J. 2013. Developing and implementing a multidisciplinary approach to assess CT in general education.
The article outlines the approach used by Oklahoma State University (OSU) in developing and implementing a model for assessing critical thinking (CT) in general education (GE) that is faculty-driven and reflective of approaches used in the classroom. Challenges with the approach are identified. Advantages of the multidisciplinary approach are also listed including aligning faculty and institutional approaches.
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66. Ortlieb, E., & Cheek, E. H. 2012, March. Using informative assessments towards effective literacy instruction.
Examples of effective literacy assessment practices for different student populations are offered in this book.
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67. Provezis, S. July 2011. Augustana College: An assessment review committee's role in engaging faculty.
Over the last six years, Augustana has been active in the area of assessing student learning and has become a leader in gaining faculty involvement. This involvement is due in part to the institutional type—which focuses on teaching and learning, the dynamic role of the Assessment Review Committee, and the communication strategies. This has allowed them to make several improvements on campus based on their assessment activities.
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68. Provezis, S. June 2012. LaGuardia Community College: Weaving assessment into the institutional fabric.
A federally designated Hispanic Serving Institution, LaGuardia Community College serves an overwhelmingly minority and first-generation college student population “from diverse cultures, ages, and educational and economic backgrounds.” Its students come from 160 different countries and speak more than 120 different primary languages. LaGuardia’s commitment to educational excellence has been acknowledged by Excelencia in Education, the Bellwether Award for Exemplary Instructional Programs, and the Community College Excellence Award from the MetLife Foundation. Because of its reputation as a leader in learning outcomes assessment, particularly through the use of electronic portfolios (ePortfolios), LaGuardia was selected by the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) as an Example of Best Practice. This report features LaGuardia’s commitment to assessment, the collaboration across units at the college, the ePortfolio as the foundation of the assessment efforts, and the institution’s robust p
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69. Puncochar, J., & Klett, M. (2013). A model for outcomes assessment of undergraduate science knowledge and inquiry processes.
To measure the efficacy of a Liberal Studies education, a Midwestern regional university developed a systematic, rubric-guided assessment based on nationally recognized science principles and inquiry processes to evaluate student work in undergraduate science laboratory courses relative to a liberal education. The rubric presented a direct measure of student understandings of science inquiry processes. The assessment procedure used stratified random sampling at confidence levels of 95% to select student work, maintained anonymity of students and faculty, addressed concerns of university faculty, and completed a continuous improvement feedback loop by informing faculty of assessment results to assess and refine science-inquiry processes of course content. The procedure resulted in an assessment system for benchmarking science inquiry processes evident in student work and offered insights into the effect of undergraduate science laboratory courses on student knowledge and understanding.
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70. Rhodes, T. L. 2010. Assessing outcomes and improving achievement: Tips and tools for using rubrics.
"This publication provides practical advice on the development and effective use of rubrics to evaluate college student achievement at various levels. Also included are the rubrics developed by faculty teams for fifteen liberal learning outcomes through AAC&U's Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) project."
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71. Rhodes, T.L. 2012. Show me the learning: Value, accreditation, and the quality of the degree.
This article helps situate discussions regarding engaging faculty in higher education student learning assessments in a larger higher education context. While it remains pivotal that student learning assessments should be inspired and led by the input and experiences of faculty, whether through surveys, focus groups and/or interviews, these perspectives also need to be combined with other higher education perspectives that have a stake in student learning assessments, such as with accreditation institutions, employers, and policy makers’ perspectives. By viewing student learning outcome assessments from a more holistic perspective – while still being led by faculty input – the success and effectiveness of student learning outcome assessments for all participating parties is greater.
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72. Richardson, J. T. E. 2005. Instruments for obtaining student feedback: A review of the literature.
This paper reviews the research evidence concerning the use of formal instruments to measure students’ evaluations of their teachers, students’ satisfaction with their programmes and students’ perceptions of the quality of their programmes.
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73. Ridley, D.R., & Smith, E.D. (2006). Writing across the curriculum works: The impact of writing emphasis upon senior exit writing samples.
Seniors’ writing skills were assessed in 1998 at a medium-sized public university. Blind scoring, a standard scoring guide, and trained graders were used. Curricular writing emphasis was assessed through a syllabus study, yielding a Curricular Emphasis Score. Controlling for entry-level skill in writing, Writing Score and Curricular Emphasis were highly correlated.
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74. Roueche, J.E., Ely, E.E., and Roueche, S.D. 2001. In pursuit of excellence: The Community College of Denver.
This book reports on how Community College of Denver (CCD) improved student success despite limited resources and outlines CCD's recommendations for other community colleges in regard to faculty, creating models for developmental education, and using available technology to improve student success.
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75. Rudestam, K., Schoenholtz-Read, J., Fontaine, G., Chun, G., Shapiro, J., Hughes, S., & Kramer, S. 2010. Handbook of online learning (2nd ed.).
This book addresses the issue of online learning in a multifaceted approach. Included in this book are discussions regarding the theoretical understandings of online learning and discussions regarding practical considerations. In particular, the book addresses the conceptual understanding of online learning, learning how to build cultures and communities in online environments, online learning and globalization and ethical considerations. There are also discussions regarding what it means to have an online course from an institutional perspective, the relation between faculty and students in online learning, and issues of online programs and accreditation.
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76. Selmer, J., Jonasson, C., & Lauring, J. 2012. Knowledge processing and faculty engagement in multicultural university settings: A social learning perspective.
This article presents a study based on social learning theory and social exchange theory that sought to understand the relation between faculty members’ knowledge/awareness within multicultural higher education settings and their engagement as faculty. The study consisted of using a multiple regression analysis method. The study argues that increased faculty members’ knowledge/awareness within higher education settings is an indicator of higher faculty engagement.
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77. Smith, B. P. 2007. Student ratings of teaching effectiveness: An analysis of end-of-course faculty evaluations .
The purpose of this study was to describe student ratings of teaching effectiveness for faculty in the College of Education (COE) at a Research I institution in the Southern United States.
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78. Tweedell, C. Sep/Oct2011. Assessment on a budget: Overcoming challenges of time and money.
Abstract: The article focuses on the strategies for educational assessment. It says that having faculty develop program-level learning outcomes is one of the first steps in organizing program assessment. It adds that standardized tests are not designed for a specific institution and may have only a limited relationship with improving learning outcomes. Moreover, the learning of the students in their educational program is the best assessment technique.
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79. University of Southern California. The Delphi project on the changing faculty and student success.
The purpose of this project is to examine and develop solutions to change the nature of the professoriate, the causes of the rise of non-tenure-track faculty, and the impact of this change on the teaching and learning environment.
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80. Wilson, D., & Conyers, M. 2013. Five big ideas for effective teaching: Connecting mind, brain, and education research to classroom practice.
In their most recent project, Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching, Wilson and Conyers present and describe the influential, big-picture findings from the field of cognitive psychology in the past decade. Additionally to providing some introductory information about these concepts, they also explain how this information can be harnessed and put into use by educators in the field.
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