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Search returned 18 results using Keyword: "Viewpoint"



1. Banta, T. W. 2005. What draw campus leaders to embrace outcomes assessment?.
This editor's note begins with the question asked of 11 top administrators, "What can we learn from the leaders of institutions noted for outstanding work in outcomes assessment?"(p.3). This article summarize her findings.
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2. Bassis, M. March 2011. In search for a standard of quality.
Since the job of colleges and universities is to develop the talents of its students, quality should be a function, not of how much talent the school had attracted, but how much talent it had developed. Since then, the issue of talent development - of how to promote more and better learning during the college years - has been at the heart of my work as a teacher, scholar and administrator.
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3. Benjamin, R. February 2011. Avoiding a tragedy of the commons in postsecondary education.
At this moment in history, human capital -- the stock of knowledge and skills citizens possess-- is our country’s principal resource. To develop human capital requires a high performing educational system, as education is the primary venue for preserving and enhancing human capital. But a storm is brewing in plain sight. Here’s a brief, incomplete, but ominous sketch of the problem and what it means for assessment.
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4. Blasi, L. December 2011. How assessment and institutional research staff can help faculty with student learning outcomes assessment .
Institutional researchers can provide support for faculty members as they seek to improve the attainment of student learning outcomes through assessment. Sometimes a few dedicated faculty members drive the process, but increased faculty support is needed to cultivate a culture of assessment on campus.
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5. Connor, R. June 2011. Navigating a perfect storm.
There’s good reason to think that higher education is about to confront a perfect storm, a convergence of troubles that are more than the usual bluster. The economy is not just slow to recover; it may be ‘hollowing out’ in ways that undermine the old claim that going to college guarantees a good job upon graduation. Confidence in higher education may also be waning, if not among the general public then among policy makers troubled by stagnant graduation rates and slippage in the rank order of percentage of adults with baccalaureate degrees compared to some other highly developed countries.
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6. DeWitt, P. March 2012. What is satisfactory performance? Measuring students and measuring programs with rubrics.
Some assessment experts strongly recommend that a desired level of achievement be stated when measuring student performance on stated student learning outcomes. According to Nichols, the criteria should be stated in quantitative terms, as this example illustrates: “Eighty percent of those taking the CPA exam each year…will pass three of four parts of the exam” (Nichols, 1989, p. 178). In the era of rubrics, this can easily be translated to “Eighty percent of students…will score at least ‘satisfactory’ on three of the four rubric rows.”
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7. Hutchings, P., Ewell, P., Banta, T. 2012. AAHE principles of good practice: Aging nicely.
Twenty years ago, in 1992, the American Association for Higher Education’s Assessment Forum released its “Principles of Good Practice for Assessing Student Learning,” a document developed by twelve prominent scholar-practitioners of the movement. The principles have been widely used, studied, and written about (see for instance Banta, Lund, Black & Oblander, 1995), and adapted in other documents and statements. Their inclusion on the NILOA website is a welcome addition, for, like good wine, the AAHE Principles have aged quite nicely.
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8. Judd, T. P., Secolsky, C., Allen, C. February 2012. Being confident about results from rubrics.
Using rubrics to assess student learning is more and more common, and their use is almost certainly going to increase, as the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) essential learning outcomes become better known and the Lumina Degree Qualifications Profile gains traction. Both outcomes frameworks require something more than what available standardized instruments measure.
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9. Lingenfelter, P. E. May 2011. It is time to make our academic standards clear.
The seal of the United States of America bears the phrase, E Pluribus Unum, “out of many, one.” In education, however, e pluribus pluribus is a better description of our national character. We insist on “local control” in elementary and secondary education, which David Cohen and Susan Moffitt in The Ordeal of Equality suggest has impeded nearly a half-century of efforts to improve the education of poor children. In higher education “institutional autonomy” is the functional equivalent of “local control.” We resist “standardization” with every fiber of our being, while asserting our commitment to ever higher standards of scholarly achievement.
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10. Michael Bassis. August 17, 2015. The Transformation of Higher Education in America: Understanding the Changing Landscape.
Michael Bassis assembled a fairly comprehensive annotated collection of material that describe and analyze the changing landscape of American higher education from multiple points of view. The collection, A Primer on The Transformation of Higher Education in America, covers a variety of topics: changing paradigms, early calls for change, prominent analyses and prescriptions, critical concepts, processes and tools, prominent transformation efforts in both the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors, barriers to change, critiques of “transformation”, influential websites, supportive foundations and other material of note.
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11. Naser, C. R. January 2012. What assessment personnel need to know about IRBs .
Because assessment projects across all disciplines are now employing systematic research methods that include access to students’ confidential data and artifacts, faculty need to be cognizant of our obligation to protect human subjects in our research. Beyond simple compliance, we want to be respectful of students and to be sure we are acting ethically. By the same token, it is easy to misunderstand the policies and procedures of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). What is the proper role of IRBs in student learning assessment?
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12. Nyamekye, A. September 2011. Putting myself to the test.
In a routine evaluation, my principal praised my organization, management, and facilitation, but posed the following question: “How do you know the kids are really getting it?” She urged me to develop more-rigorous assessments of student learning. Ego and uncertainty inspired me to measure the impact of my instruction. I thought I was effective, but I wanted proof.
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13. Ochoa, E. M. April 2012. The state of assessment of learning outcomes.
My sense of assessment of learning outcomes in higher education is framed by what I think is its ultimate purpose and ideal end-state. Ideally, we would have a well-articulated, measurable set of desired educational outcomes associated with all our academic programs. Such measures would exhibit some commonalities in terms of capacities associated with different degree levels, as well as unique aspects by discipline and institutional mission. Student progress toward achieving those capacities would be gauged based on how far and how many of the desired outcomes have been attained using well-established metrics, rather than by seat time or actual hours of work.
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14. RiCharde, R. S. 2012. What to consider when selecting an assessment management system.
A few years ago, the primary reason for using a data management system arose from the need to manage large amounts of dynamic data more efficiently. But in the past few years, there’s been a tectonic shift in public policy that catapulted organizing assessment and institutional effectiveness data to mission-critical status.
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15. Shenoy, G. November 2011. Why assess student learning? What the measuring stick series revealed.
NILOA staff conducted a content analysis of the essays and readers’ comments. Three main findings emerged. First, general agreement does not exist as to how to define quality. In addition, who should be responsible for ensuring quality and how to measure it are unclear. In the absence of consensus on these important issues, we hope readers will use the NILOA website to continue the conversation about this important topic. And now, I offer more detail about what my analysis found.
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16. Smith, V. July 2011. Transparency drives learning at Rio Salado College .
No doubt about it, higher education is under greater scrutiny. Such scrutiny is especially intense in the case of predominantly on-line academic programs. Documenting what students are learning and making that evidence transparent are common challenges. These expectations may only increase as higher education looks for cost-effective solutions to access, retention and completion at both the institutional level and the program level.
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17. Stokes, P. August 2011. From uniformity to personalization: How to get the most out of assessment.
The potential for assessment to inform the improvement of curriculum, teaching, student performance, and institutional effectiveness has never been greater. So why aren’t our students performing better?
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18. Various. 2011, Volume 23, Number 5. Assessment update: Progress, trends, and practices in higher education.
This publication offers insights on wide-ranging issues surrounding assessment. This particular issue features articles that focus on trends within the field for the past ten years, budgets, junior faculty involvement in assessment, and course-embedded assessement.
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